Anti-corruption Law: Long Way to Go – Zhou Hucheng

From Nanfang Daily, also carried by People Net, translated by CDT:

After three years of study on anti-corruption system designing by a team of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, an anti-corruption law was proposed for China’s legislature. The necessity and public opinion basis are needless to elaborate.

But a timetable for this legislation in China is difficult to know. Even the laws on private property protection and anti-monopoly was put on the legislature’s agenda after rounds of controversy.

Who need anti-corruption law? Chinese public who have been hurt deeply by corruption and a ruling party that needs to clean up house and strengthen its governance capability. Who are against it? Those who are already corrupt or those powerful who are prepared to turn corrupt, and those who want to bribe for benefits. [Full Text in Chinese] (Page gone? Try Nanfang Daily or Yulun Jiandu)

According to authoritative statistics, 60-70% of major corruption cases were unearthed through public reporting. This shows, on the one hand, the initiativeness of the public in fighting corruption, on the other hand, it reminds us that whether we should rely on whistle-blowers to crack down on corruption, or rely on a system?

Never neglect the power of some interest groups. The occurrence of some cluster corruption cases demonstrates that the danger of commercial interests and power going hand and glove is rising. Even in some cases or localities, new interest groups or sector-corruption or policy-corruption appeared, sometimes in a legal form.

Be prepared for twists and turns on the road ahead to an anti-corruption law.

Also see a list of corrupt officials who attempted escape overseas compiled by the CASS study team, also BBC Chinese’s “China Considering Abolishing Death Penalty on Corrupt Officials

July 9, 2006 7:12 PM
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