In Battle for U.S. Carbon Caps, Eyes and Efforts Focus on China – Steven Mufson

As Bush and other G-8 leaders meet today to discuss climate change, the U.S. is expected to counter criticisms of its own inaction on the issue by raising efforts to engage China to change their practices:

Ph2007060502600This year, China is expected to surpass the United States as the leading producer of greenhouse gases, and one reason the Bush administration has declined to enact emissions limits is its concern about leaving China unchecked.

So a variety of lawmakers, environmentalists and business leaders are looking at ways to engage China in the battle against climate change — or pay the price for doing nothing. Proposed strategies range from providing financing and technology transfers to imposing special carbon-based import tariffs or changing supply contracts.

One such effort is a proposed “E-8″ group that, according to the Post article, “would deal with ecological issues and would include China, India, Brazil and South Africa.” Read the proposal for an the E-8 forum here.

Foreign businesses, not just Coca-Cola, are also getting in on the green act. From the Washington Post article:

Some businesses are taking their own steps to influence Chinese behavior — and polish their own images as “green” companies. Yesterday computer maker Dell, which spends $16 billion a year on Chinese-made parts, said it would add a question about carbon emissions to the quality-performance reviews it gives its suppliers. “The total score is a big part of whether they get our business,” said Dell spokesman Brian Hilton, who also said the carbon emissions would be worth two points, often enough to send Dell to a different supplier. [Full text]