Vows of Change in China Belie Private Warning

Since his ascent to the top of the Communist Party, Xi Jinping has pushed a public image of change and approachability, while announcing a crackdown on corruption at all levels of government. In the New York Times, Chris Buckley writes about the tensions between this public face and private messages he is sending to the party, including a speech in December when he appeared to take a firm stand against substantial political reforms: In Mr. Xi’s first three months as China’s top leader, he has gyrated between defending the party’s absolute hold on power and vowing a fundamental assault on entrenched interests of the party elite that fuel corruption. How to balance those goals presents a quandary to Mr. Xi, whose agenda could easily be undermined by rival leaders determined to protect their own bailiwicks and on guard against anything that weakens the party’s authority, insiders and analysts say. “Everyone is talking about reform, but in fact everyone has a fear of reform,” said Ma Yong, a historian at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. For party leaders, he added: “The question is: Can society be kept under control while you go forward? That’s the test.” [...] The tension between embracing change and defending top-down party power has been an abiding theme in China since Deng set the country on its economic transformation in the late 1970s. But Mr. Xi has come to power at a time when such strains are especially acute, and the pressure of public expectations for greater official accountability is growing, amplified by millions of participants in online forums. ...
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