Badiucao (巴丢草):Let Daddy Xi Get Inoculated First

responds to the recent scandal over the distribution of illegal vaccinations by showing Xi Jinping with his pants down:

Let Daddy Xi Get Inoculated First, by Badiucao for CDT:
让大大先打

Many parents in China are furious at revelations that a criminal ring sold and distributed up to two million doses of improperly stored vaccines in 24 provinces since 2010, and that the government waited almost a year before telling the public. While expired or improperly stored may not pose an immediate health threat, according to the WHO, they become ineffective in protecting against the often-deadly diseases they were intended to prevent. Charlie Campbell reports for TIME:

According to state media, a mother and daughter from eastern China’s Shandong province have been caught peddling 25 kinds of unrefrigerated vaccines — including for polio, mumps, rabies, hepatitis B, encephalitis and meningococcal diseases — to medical facilities across 24 Chinese provinces since 2010.

Inflaming the public backlash, authorities had apparently known about the case since last April, though only publicized the news late Friday in a belated attempt to trace potential victims. Moreover, the elder suspect, a 47-year-old woman surnamed Pang, had apparently been convicted of the same offense in 2009 but only received a suspended sentence. State media admitted the compromised inoculations could have resulted in paralysis and even death.

“Twenty-four provinces, five years already, and how many children! It’s been nearly a year and then they reveal this! Isn’t this genocide? Words cannot express how angry I am!” posted one user of China’s Twitter-like microblog Weibo, reports the BBC. [Source]

Badiucao’s title alludes to an incident in 1994 when schoolchildren attending a theater performance in Karamay, Xinjiang, were told to stay in their seats when a fire broke out in order to “let the leaders leave first.” Twenty-five leaders were saved that day while 325 people died, including 288 children. That phrase has since become a popular Internet meme used when leaders are seen as putting their own needs above those of the people. The title also references a popular nickname for Xi.

Cover2You can support Badiucao by buying “Watching Big Brother: Political Cartoons by Badiucao,” available in EPUB and PDF formats. The book covers the early years of Xi’s presidency, from December 2013 to January 2016. No contribution is required, but all donations will go to Badiucao to support his artwork. CDT is also selling merchandise featuring Badiucao’s work in our Zazzle store. See also interviews with the artist by CDT, PRI’s The World and Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s RN. Many of his earlier cartoons are available via CDT.