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空椅子 (kōngyǐzi): empty chair
 
空椅子 (kōngyǐzi): empty chair
Following the Nobel prize ceremony during which imprisoned Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo was represented by his empty seat, the term “empty chair” (空椅子) has become a banned word in Chinese cyberspace.  As reported by the ‘’China Digital Times’’, Some bloggers who have used the term have had their accounts blocked, and a campaign to post images of an empty chair on blogs and microblogs have seen the posts censored and images removed; some accounts have even been deleted for posting the image.  
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Following the Nobel prize ceremony during which imprisoned Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo was represented by his empty seat, the term “empty chair” (空椅子) has become a banned word in Chinese cyberspace.  As reported by the [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/12/netizens-interpret-empty-chairs-on-the-cover-of-southern-metropolis-daily/ ''China Digital Times''], Some bloggers who have used the term have had their accounts blocked, and a campaign to post images of an empty chair on blogs and microblogs have seen the posts censored and images removed; some accounts have even been deleted for posting the image.  
  
‘’China Digital Times’’ also reports [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/12/netizens-interpret-empty-chairs-on-the-cover-of-southern-metropolis-daily/  here] about the ambiguous cover of the Guangzhou-based Southern Metropolis Daily, one of China’s most popular and outspoken newspapers.  Was this cover a veiled reference to Liu Xiaobo?
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''China Digital Times'' also reports [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/12/netizens-interpret-empty-chairs-on-the-cover-of-southern-metropolis-daily/  here] about the ambiguous cover of the Guangzhou-based Southern Metropolis Daily, one of China’s most popular and outspoken newspapers.  Was this cover a veiled reference to Liu Xiaobo?
  
 
For more on China’s attempt to censor images empty chairs, see [http://www.news.com.au/technology/china-erases-picture-of-nobel-winners-empty-chair/story-e6frfro0-1225970053429 here] (English) and [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/tag/%E7%A9%BA%E6%A4%85%E5%AD%90/ here] (Chinese).
 
For more on China’s attempt to censor images empty chairs, see [http://www.news.com.au/technology/china-erases-picture-of-nobel-winners-empty-chair/story-e6frfro0-1225970053429 here] (English) and [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/tag/%E7%A9%BA%E6%A4%85%E5%AD%90/ here] (Chinese).

Revision as of 22:49, 30 December 2010

空椅子 (kōngyǐzi): empty chair Following the Nobel prize ceremony during which imprisoned Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo was represented by his empty seat, the term “empty chair” (空椅子) has become a banned word in Chinese cyberspace. As reported by the China Digital Times, Some bloggers who have used the term have had their accounts blocked, and a campaign to post images of an empty chair on blogs and microblogs have seen the posts censored and images removed; some accounts have even been deleted for posting the image.

China Digital Times also reports here about the ambiguous cover of the Guangzhou-based Southern Metropolis Daily, one of China’s most popular and outspoken newspapers. Was this cover a veiled reference to Liu Xiaobo?

For more on China’s attempt to censor images empty chairs, see here (English) and here (Chinese).