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帝都 (dì dū): imperial capital
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<h3>''dìdū'' 帝都</h3>
  
This is a recent internet nickname for Beijing. Formerly, the phrase “imperial capital” was used [http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B8%9D%E9%83%BD in reference to the capitals of imperialist countries], but as countries have ceased to proclaim themselves empires, the phrase “imperial capital” has become synonymous with a nation's capital. Beijing's nickname of “imperial capital” is often contrasted with an internet nickname for Shanghai, 魔都 (mó dū), which means “devil/monster capital.
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[[File:帝都.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''The imperial capital in 2012. (Source: [https://www.flickr.com/photos/luther418/8514994016/ Yong . L])'']]Beijing. Often contrasted with the Demon Capital (魔都 mó dū), i.e. [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/shanghai/ Shanghai].
  
The use of “imperial capital” to mean Beijing has perhaps increased as internet users have relied more and more on code words, homonyms, and creatively indirect references to avoid and circumvent censorship. While such semantic wordplay originally served a purely pragmatic purpose, it has become an ingrained part of some forms of the written Chinese language, with even very common words sometimes replaced by close homonyms; for example, “what” 什么 (shénme) is sometimes replaced by “mystical horse” 神马 (shén mǎ). Instances of such wordplay seem innocuous, but are part of a larger tradition of semantically subversive practice.
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The use of "imperial capital" to mean Beijing has increased as Internet users have come to rely more and more on code words, homonyms, and creatively indirect references to avoid and circumvent censorship. "Imperial capital" is [http://s.weibo.com/weibo/%25E5%25B8%259D%25E9%2583%25BD?topnav=1&wvr=6&topsug=1 blocked on Weibo as of June 9, 2015].
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'''Example:'''
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<blockquote>''Diyiweiwen'' (@第一微闻): In February I ate [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2014/02/smog-makes-beijing-barely-suitable-life/ smog]. In March I ate [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2013/03/sensitive-words-npc-shockers-and-disappointments/ sand]. In April I ate [https://rectified.herokuapp.com/?p=421 catkins]. Today this damn meal has arrived!! Long live the '''imperial capital'''! (April 15, 2015)</blockquote>
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<blockquote>二月吃霾,三月吃沙,四月吃絮,今天尼玛来了个套餐!!'''帝都'''万岁! ['''[https://freeweibo.com/weibo/3832026400978540 Chinese]''']</blockquote>
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<blockquote>[[File:这套餐.jpg|300px|thumb|center]]</blockquote>
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[[Category:Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]][[Category:Party and State]]

Latest revision as of 21:11, 14 March 2016

dìdū 帝都

The imperial capital in 2012. (Source: Yong . L)

Beijing. Often contrasted with the Demon Capital (魔都 mó dū), i.e. Shanghai.

The use of "imperial capital" to mean Beijing has increased as Internet users have come to rely more and more on code words, homonyms, and creatively indirect references to avoid and circumvent censorship. "Imperial capital" is blocked on Weibo as of June 9, 2015.


Example:

Diyiweiwen (@第一微闻): In February I ate smog. In March I ate sand. In April I ate catkins. Today this damn meal has arrived!! Long live the imperial capital! (April 15, 2015)

二月吃霾,三月吃沙,四月吃絮,今天尼玛来了个套餐!!帝都万岁! [Chinese]

这套餐.jpg