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[[File:葛优躺平.jpg|thumb|300px|right|''A popular meme in China featuring actor Ge You in China's first sitcom "I Love My Family"]]
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[[File:葛优躺平.jpg|thumb|300px|right|''"I know I am wasting my life, but I just don't want to stop." Actor Ge You, from China's first sitcom, "I Love My Family," has been co-opted by the lie-down crowd.'']]
  
 
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Lie-down, also known as lie-downism or lie-flat, became a popular expression on Chinese social media around May 2021. Young people use the phrase to describe a passive-aggressive way of resisting [[involution]], or hyper-competition. State-owned media criticized lie-downism, with [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666537.html some internet platforms censoring the phrase].
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Tired of hyper-competition, young Chinese are now "lying down." Also known as "lying flat" or "lie-downism," this expression of resistance to [[involution]] rose to memedom on Chinese social media in 2021. State-owned media have criticized lie-downism, and some popular platforms, such as [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666537.html Douban], have censored the phrase and related groups.
  
Lie-downism rose to prominence in May 2021 as a defeatist response to traditional markers of success, including a competitive career, property ownership, and parenting. It is also used to denote despair towards the [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666423.html widening gap between the rich and the poor,] and the lack of upward mobility. Closely related was the phrase [[involution]].
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Lie-downism arose as a response to traditional markers of success, such as a competitive career, property ownership, and parenthood. It is also an expression of despair at the [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666423.html widening gap between rich and poor] and lack of upward mobility. Some trace its origins to a [https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/china-lying-flat-stress/2021/06/04/cef36902-c42f-11eb-89a4-b7ae22aa193e_story.html April 2021 Tieba post]. However, an [https://web.archive.org/web/20210218001420/https://www.douban.com/group/697650/ Internet Archive snapshot of the Douban lying down group] dates from February 18, 2021 and lists its creation date as June 30, 2020. The same snapshot shows posts dating as far back as July 21, 2020. Regardless, lying down really "took off" across the Chinese internet in May 2021.
  
Hashtags related to lie-downism racked up millions of views on Weibo and other social media platforms, as state-owned media criticized the purported cynicism. On May 27, 2021, the Communist Youth League’s official Weibo account posted a tribute to young patriots, using the hashtag #当代年轻人从未选择躺平#, which roughly translates to “contemporary youths have never wanted to lie down.”  It disabled comment function after [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666486.html drawing thousands of angry replies]. Many Weibo users refuted CYL by saying that they would happily serve the country, but not the “capital.” [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666486.html One comment saved by CDT Chinese] reads: “Now young people can still say that it’s ok to serve the country, but not ok to serve the capitalists. In 10 or 20 years, when young people say no to both, I’d love to see the result of this development model which bars the general public from enjoying the fruit.” Other key opinion leaders also weighed in on lie-downism, including the editor-in-chief of the Global Times Hu Xijin, famous entrepreneur Yu Minhong, and state TV host Bai Yansong. [https://weibo.com/1989660417/Khznl9L8C?utm_campaign=%E6%96%B0%E9%97%BB%E5%AE%9E%E9%AA%8C%E5%AE%A4&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Revue%20newsletter&type=comment  They have all been ridiculed for being self-serving and tone-deaf] to young people’s struggles.
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As hashtags related to lie-downism racked up millions of views on Weibo and other social media platforms, state-owned media criticized the trending term. On May 27, 2021, the Communist Youth League’s official Weibo account posted a tribute to young patriots with the hashtag #todaysyouthneverliedown (dāngdài niánqīngrén cóngwèi xuǎnzé tǎngpíng #当代年轻人从未选择躺平#). Many users replied that they would happily serve the country, but not [[Wikipedia:Capital_(economics)|capital]]. "Now young people still say OK to serving the country, but not the capitalists," user [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666486.html @颍源居士 wrote]. "I'd love to see what happens ten or 20 years from now, when they say no to both." The CYL eventually disabled the comment function on the post after receiving [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/666486.html thousands of angry replies].
  
On May 30, 2021, [https://www.douban.com/group/697650/ Douban group for lie-downism] which had close to ten thousand members was banned.  
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Key opinion leaders have also weighed in on lie-downism, including Global Times Editor-in-Chief [[Hu Xijin]], entrepreneur [[Wikipedia:Yu Minhong|Yu Minhong]], and state TV host [[Wikipedia:Bai Yansong|Bai Yansong]]. Every one of them has been [https://weibo.com/1989660417/Khznl9L8C?utm_campaign=%E6%96%B0%E9%97%BB%E5%AE%9E%E9%AA%8C%E5%AE%A4&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Revue%20newsletter&type=comment ridiculed] for being self-serving and tone-deaf to young people’s struggles.
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On May 30, 2021, the [https://web.archive.org/web/20210527081419/https://www.douban.com/group/697650/ lie-downism Douban group], which had close to 10,000 members, was [https://www.douban.com/group/697650/ banned].  
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====See Also====
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{{ #dpl: linksto = {{FULLPAGENAME}} }}
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*[[996]]
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*[[cut chives]]
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*[[involution]]
  
 
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Latest revision as of 21:32, 3 January 2022

tǎng píng | 躺平

"I know I am wasting my life, but I just don't want to stop." Actor Ge You, from China's first sitcom, "I Love My Family," has been co-opted by the lie-down crowd.

Tired of hyper-competition, young Chinese are now "lying down." Also known as "lying flat" or "lie-downism," this expression of resistance to involution rose to memedom on Chinese social media in 2021. State-owned media have criticized lie-downism, and some popular platforms, such as Douban, have censored the phrase and related groups.

Lie-downism arose as a response to traditional markers of success, such as a competitive career, property ownership, and parenthood. It is also an expression of despair at the widening gap between rich and poor and lack of upward mobility. Some trace its origins to a April 2021 Tieba post. However, an Internet Archive snapshot of the Douban lying down group dates from February 18, 2021 and lists its creation date as June 30, 2020. The same snapshot shows posts dating as far back as July 21, 2020. Regardless, lying down really "took off" across the Chinese internet in May 2021.

As hashtags related to lie-downism racked up millions of views on Weibo and other social media platforms, state-owned media criticized the trending term. On May 27, 2021, the Communist Youth League’s official Weibo account posted a tribute to young patriots with the hashtag #todaysyouthneverliedown (dāngdài niánqīngrén cóngwèi xuǎnzé tǎngpíng #当代年轻人从未选择躺平#). Many users replied that they would happily serve the country, but not capital. "Now young people still say OK to serving the country, but not the capitalists," user @颍源居士 wrote. "I'd love to see what happens ten or 20 years from now, when they say no to both." The CYL eventually disabled the comment function on the post after receiving thousands of angry replies.

Key opinion leaders have also weighed in on lie-downism, including Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin, entrepreneur Yu Minhong, and state TV host Bai Yansong. Every one of them has been ridiculed for being self-serving and tone-deaf to young people’s struggles.

On May 30, 2021, the lie-downism Douban group, which had close to 10,000 members, was banned.

See Also

More from CDT