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感谢国家 (gǎn xiè guó jiā): thanks to the country
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<h3>''gǎnxiè guójiā'' 感谢国家</h3>
  
The phrase, “thanks to the country” became a popular Internet expression after speed skater Zhou Yang (周洋) won the 1,500 meter event in the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. After winning the event, Zhou thanked her parents but failed to thank her country. This lapse was criticized by Yu Zaiqing, Deputy Director of the National Sports Bureau. Yu said that she should have first thanked her country. Heeding his advice, Zhou held a do-over news conference in which she first thanked her country and then secondly thanked her parents and coaches.
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[[File:ganxieguojia.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''"Write 'thanks to the leaders' 10,000 times... no, "Thanks to the country!!'" (artist unknown)'']]Forced praise for the Chinese Party-state. Originates from a controversy over remarks by Olympic gold medalist Zhou Yang.
  
In modern internet usage, “thanks to the country” is an ironic or sarcastic phrase implying that the “thanks” was forced or was not merited. It can be used after mentioning an action taken by the state with only minor benefits and substantial losses or costs. For example, “The world should really thank the country for spending USD 58 billion on such a great World Expo,” or “Kim Jung-Il should really thank the country for showing him such a good time while he’s in China.” It can also be used when the government takes small measures to address a problem that the government caused in the first place. For example, “I have to thank my country for ending the Cultural Revolution.
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In February 2010, Chinese speed skater Zhou Yang won the 1,500 meter event at the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. She thanked her parents for their support at a press conference following her win. Yu Zaiqing, Deputy Director of the National Sports Bureau, [http://www.chinahush.com/2010/03/07/must-thank-the-country-before-your-parents/ criticized her for not first thanking her country]. Netizens and state media alike balked at Yu's callousness. The [http://old.seattletimes.com/html/sports/2011296263_apolychinaungratefulskater.html entry about him on Baidu Baike was altered to say] that he had "no mother and no father" and was "raised by the Communist Party." As of November 2017, the first paragraph of the Baike entry describes the 2010 controversy, later noting that he was [http://baike.baidu.com/view/147174.htm removed from his position at the National Sports Bureau] in September 2011.
  
[[File:ganxie3.jpg|500px|thumb|center|''Zhou Yang compelled to worship before the altar of the government's priorities: 1) Thank the country, 2) Thank those who supported me, 3) Thank my coach, 4) Thank the staff, 5) Thank my parents'']]
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Despite the negative reaction to Yu, at a subsequent press conference [https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/a-word-of-advice-to-chinas-athletes-thank-your-nation/article4309861/ Zhou Yang thanked China first, then her parents and coaches].
  
[[File:ganxieguojia.jpg|500px|thumb|center|''“I am going to punish you by having you write the words, ‛Thanks to my leaders’ 10,000 times....... No, that's not right; how about you write, ‛Thanks to the country.’”'']]
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Giving "thanks to the country" is now disingenuous praise for an overbearing regime. The phrase can also be used to criticize a state project of minor benefit and substantial cost, or when the government takes small measures to address a problem of its own making:
  
[[File:ganxie2.jpg|500px|thumb|center|''If God gave me another chance this is what I would say, “First I want to thank my country and especially Yu Zaiqing, Deputy Director of the National Sports Bureau, who criticized me for first thanking my parents. . . .” '']]
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<blockquote>''-meng-lang-'' (@-梦-郎-): As a Chinese person, you must understand gratitude. First of all, we must give '''thanks to the country''' and to the Party. Although many years have passed and the lives of the people at the bottom rung of society haven't improved, we face greater pressure than before, and happiness is farther from our reach, this could all just be an American imperialist plot... [[File:Cool_org.gif ]]</blockquote>
  
[[Category: Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]]
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<blockquote>作为中国人,要懂得感恩,首先咱们要'''感谢国家''',感谢党,很多年虽然过去了,底层人民的生活虽然并没多大改善,但是压力应该比以前更大了,幸福也离我们更远了,也许这就是美帝国主义的阴谋。。。(November 23, 2015) ['''[http://weibo.com/5758220805/D5ewv4N8U Chinese]''']</blockquote>
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<blockquote>''Fennudezhibei_IRS'' (@愤怒的纸杯_IRS): '''Thanks to the country'''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s policies... I'm an [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/one-child-policy/ only child].</blockquote>
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<blockquote>'''感谢国家'''政策。。。。我是独生子女 (November 24, 2015) ['''[http://weibo.com/3235409004/D5pGzteAP Chinese]''']</blockquote>
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[[Category:Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]][[Category:Censorship and Propaganda]]

Latest revision as of 20:03, 23 November 2017

gǎnxiè guójiā 感谢国家

"Write 'thanks to the leaders' 10,000 times... no, "Thanks to the country!!'" (artist unknown)

Forced praise for the Chinese Party-state. Originates from a controversy over remarks by Olympic gold medalist Zhou Yang.

In February 2010, Chinese speed skater Zhou Yang won the 1,500 meter event at the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. She thanked her parents for their support at a press conference following her win. Yu Zaiqing, Deputy Director of the National Sports Bureau, criticized her for not first thanking her country. Netizens and state media alike balked at Yu's callousness. The entry about him on Baidu Baike was altered to say that he had "no mother and no father" and was "raised by the Communist Party." As of November 2017, the first paragraph of the Baike entry describes the 2010 controversy, later noting that he was removed from his position at the National Sports Bureau in September 2011.

Despite the negative reaction to Yu, at a subsequent press conference Zhou Yang thanked China first, then her parents and coaches.

Giving "thanks to the country" is now disingenuous praise for an overbearing regime. The phrase can also be used to criticize a state project of minor benefit and substantial cost, or when the government takes small measures to address a problem of its own making:

-meng-lang- (@-梦-郎-): As a Chinese person, you must understand gratitude. First of all, we must give thanks to the country and to the Party. Although many years have passed and the lives of the people at the bottom rung of society haven't improved, we face greater pressure than before, and happiness is farther from our reach, this could all just be an American imperialist plot... Cool org.gif

作为中国人,要懂得感恩,首先咱们要感谢国家,感谢党,很多年虽然过去了,底层人民的生活虽然并没多大改善,但是压力应该比以前更大了,幸福也离我们更远了,也许这就是美帝国主义的阴谋。。。(November 23, 2015) [Chinese]


Fennudezhibei_IRS (@愤怒的纸杯_IRS): Thanks to the country's policies... I'm an only child.

感谢国家政策。。。。我是独生子女 (November 24, 2015) [Chinese]