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'''别有用心 (biéyǒuyòngxīn): ulterior motives'''
 
'''别有用心 (biéyǒuyòngxīn): ulterior motives'''
 
   
 
   
[[File:ulteriormotives.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Former Foreign Ministry Spokesman [[Bird Anus|Qin Gang]]: “Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives.” (Tencent)'']] The government and official media often blame social unrest on people who “[[don’t understand the actual situation]]” following a few leaders with “ulterior motives.”
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[[File:ulteriormotives.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Former Foreign Ministry Spokesman [[Bird Anus|Qin Gang]]: “Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives.” (Tencent)'']]  
  
To netizens, this implies those who are critical of the government have no legitimate grievances and are only lashing out as the pawns of nefarious instigators.
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A phrase often used by the official media to blame foreign forces and domestic dissidents for social unrest and criticism towards Chinese government.
  
Netizens delight in twisting these words. For example, in January 2013, a police officer was stopped in his car because he didn't have any license plates. The officer explained that the screws holding the license plate on had come out. “A screw with ulterior motives” ([http://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/2013/01/%E6%96%B0%E9%97%BB%E8%B7%9F%E5%B8%96%E5%B1%80-%E4%B8%80%E4%B8%AA%E5%88%AB%E6%9C%89%E7%94%A8%E5%BF%83%E7%9A%84%E8%9E%BA%E4%B8%9D/ 一个别有用心的螺丝]), quipped one NetEase user.  
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Netizens sometimes twist this phrase to mock the government.
  
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'''Examples:'''
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<blockquote>''Wengtao2015'' (@翁涛2015): If you yell on street: "Diaoyu Islands belong to China!" You are a patriot. If you instead yell: "Outer Mongolia and Vladivostok belong to China!" You may be arrested as a mad person or someone who has ulterior motives! Why is that? (February 14, 2015)</blockquote>
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<blockquote> 如果你站在街上喊:“钓鱼岛是中国的!”你就是爱国者;你若喊:“外蒙、海参崴是中国的!”,你就是有可能被当作疯子或者别有用心抓起来!这是为什么? [[https://freeweibo.com/weibo/%40%E7%BF%81%E6%B6%9B2015 '''Chinese''']]</blockquote>
  
  
 
[[Category: Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]] [[Category: Memorable Government Quotes and Stock Phrases]]
 
[[Category: Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]] [[Category: Memorable Government Quotes and Stock Phrases]]

Revision as of 16:38, 22 May 2015

别有用心 (biéyǒuyòngxīn): ulterior motives

Former Foreign Ministry Spokesman Qin Gang: “Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives.” (Tencent)

A phrase often used by the official media to blame foreign forces and domestic dissidents for social unrest and criticism towards Chinese government.

Netizens sometimes twist this phrase to mock the government.

Examples:

Wengtao2015 (@翁涛2015): If you yell on street: "Diaoyu Islands belong to China!" You are a patriot. If you instead yell: "Outer Mongolia and Vladivostok belong to China!" You may be arrested as a mad person or someone who has ulterior motives! Why is that? (February 14, 2015)

如果你站在街上喊:“钓鱼岛是中国的!”你就是爱国者;你若喊:“外蒙、海参崴是中国的!”,你就是有可能被当作疯子或者别有用心抓起来!这是为什么? [Chinese]