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别有用心 (bié yǒu yòng xīn): ulterior motives
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<h3>''biéyǒuyòngxīn'' 别有用心 </h3>
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[[File:ulteriormotives.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Former Foreign Ministry Spokesman [[Bird Anus|Qin Gang]]: "Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives." (Tencent)'']]
  
"Those with ulterior motives" is a phrase often used by the government and the official media to describe instigators of social unrest.
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A phrase often used by the official media to blame foreign forces and domestic dissidents for social unrest and criticism of the Chinese government.
  
Here is an example of how the phrase is used in Chinese:
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Netizens sometimes twist this phrase to mock the government.
  
: "Whenever there is a mass incident, some government agencies will always issue statements to the effect that people who '[[didn't understand the actual situation]]' were incited by 'those with ulterior motives.'"
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'''Example:'''
每有群体性事件,一些政府机关的文宣必定是“不明真相”的群众是被“别有用心”的人蛊惑的。
 
  
Netizens are often irked by the phrase because it suggests that those who are critical of the government (because of pollution, illegal housing demolitions, corruption, etc) have no legitimate grievance and are only lashing out against the government as the pawns of others with mysterious ulterior motives.
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<blockquote>''Wengtao2015'' (@翁涛2015): If you yell on the street, "Diaoyu Islands belong to China!" you are a patriot. If you instead yell, "Outer Mongolia and Vladivostok belong to China!" you may be arrested as a mad person or someone who has '''ulterior motives'''! Why is that? (February 14, 2015)</blockquote>
  
[[File:ulteriormotives.jpg|400px|thumb|center|''[[Qin Gang]]: Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives.'']]
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<blockquote> 如果你站在街上喊:"钓鱼岛是中国的!" 你就是爱国者;你若喊:"外蒙、海参崴是中国的!",你就是有可能被当作疯子或者'''别有用心'''抓起来!这是为什么? [[https://freeweibo.com/weibo/%40%E7%BF%81%E6%B6%9B2015 '''Chinese''']]</blockquote>
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In August of 2016, "[[foreign (hostile) forces | foreign hostile forces]]" with "ulterior motives" made [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/08/fourth-black-friday-detainee-sentenced-show-trial/ multiple appearances in the apparently scripted confessions of the first round of trials] for rights lawyers and activists detained in the [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/black-friday-2015/ 2015 "Black Friday" crackdown]. The language being used in the courtroom confessions and [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/08/rights-activists-trial-china-cites-western-plot/ echoed by state media coverage] was suspiciously similar to that being used in a [http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/08/hk-activist-branded-us-backed-separatist-govt-video/ parallel propaganda campaign warning against foreign attempts to foment a "color revolution"] in China.
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See also [[foreign (hostile) forces]].
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[[Category:Lexicon]][[Category:Censorship and Propaganda]]

Latest revision as of 20:56, 20 January 2021

biéyǒuyòngxīn 别有用心

Former Foreign Ministry Spokesman Qin Gang: "Those who claim that the Chinese government supports hackers have ulterior motives." (Tencent)

A phrase often used by the official media to blame foreign forces and domestic dissidents for social unrest and criticism of the Chinese government.

Netizens sometimes twist this phrase to mock the government.

Example:

Wengtao2015 (@翁涛2015): If you yell on the street, "Diaoyu Islands belong to China!" you are a patriot. If you instead yell, "Outer Mongolia and Vladivostok belong to China!" you may be arrested as a mad person or someone who has ulterior motives! Why is that? (February 14, 2015)

如果你站在街上喊:"钓鱼岛是中国的!" 你就是爱国者;你若喊:"外蒙、海参崴是中国的!",你就是有可能被当作疯子或者别有用心抓起来!这是为什么? [Chinese]

In August of 2016, " foreign hostile forces" with "ulterior motives" made multiple appearances in the apparently scripted confessions of the first round of trials for rights lawyers and activists detained in the 2015 "Black Friday" crackdown. The language being used in the courtroom confessions and echoed by state media coverage was suspiciously similar to that being used in a parallel propaganda campaign warning against foreign attempts to foment a "color revolution" in China.

See also foreign (hostile) forces.