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==Fù Guóyǒng | [[傅国涌]]==
 
==Fù Guóyǒng | [[傅国涌]]==
  
Fu Guoyong (born. 1967) is a writer and independent historian. He was born in Yueqing, Zhejiang Province, and studied to become a teacher. Currently based in Hangzhou, his research focuses on the intellectual history of modern China.
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Fu Guoyong (b. 1967) is a popular writer and independent historian whose work focuses on Chinese intellectual history from the late imperial period to the present. Hailing from Yueqing, Zhejiang Province, Fu studied to become a teacher. He has written and edited dozens of [https://book.douban.com/author/4515247/ books], including a biography of martial arts novelist [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jin_Yong Jin Yong]. He is currently based in Hangzhou.
  
Fu conducted extensive research on Lin Zhao, an outspoken critic in the 1950s and 1960s, who was executed for criticizing Mao Zedong’s policy. In 2014, Fu wrote [https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/2020/04/%e6%97%a0%e9%80%b8%e8%af%b4-%e5%82%85%e5%9b%bd%e6%b6%8c%ef%bc%9a%e6%9e%97%e6%98%ad%e5%92%8c%e5%a5%b9%e7%9a%84%e6%97%b6%e4%bb%a3/ an essay titled Lin Zhao and Her Era.] The essay resurfaced in April 2020, before being censored on Chinese internet. It wrote:
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Fu has conducted extensive research on [[Lin Zhao]], an outspoken critic of Mao who was executed for her beliefs. In 2014, Fu wrote an essay titled "Lin Zhao and Her Era" ([https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/2020/04/%e6%97%a0%e9%80%b8%e8%af%b4-%e5%82%85%e5%9b%bd%e6%b6%8c%ef%bc%9a%e6%9e%97%e6%98%ad%e5%92%8c%e5%a5%b9%e7%9a%84%e6%97%b6%e4%bb%a3/ 林昭和她的时代]) in which he argued that "her life really started the moment she was executed" and that "Lin Zhao’s era will not end until we can freely talk about her in Mainland China."
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<blockquote>[...] Lin Zhao’s era will not end until we can freely discuss her in Mainland China. Only when Lin Zhao can be publicly talked about, researched, made into movies, and discussed will the era truly come to an end.
  
<blockquote>[...] Lin Zhao’s era will not end until we can freely discuss her in Mainland China. Only when Lin Zhao can be publicly talked about, researched, made into movies, and discussed will the era truly come to an end.
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[...] Lin Zhao was not well-known before her death. She was known only by her classmates and acquaintances. It was only after her death that more and more people began to pay attention and get to know her. So her life really started the moment she was executed. No one knows when her era will end, but we shall believe that there will be an end some day. ['''[https://chinadigitaltimes.net/chinese/2020/04/%e6%97%a0%e9%80%b8%e8%af%b4-%e5%82%85%e5%9b%bd%e6%b6%8c%ef%bc%9a%e6%9e%97%e6%98%ad%e5%92%8c%e5%a5%b9%e7%9a%84%e6%97%b6%e4%bb%a3/ 林昭和她的时代 Chinese]''']</blockquote>
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The essay briefly resurfaced in April 2020 (Lin Zhao was executed on April 29, 1968) before being censored again.
[...] Lin Zhao was not well-known before her death. She was known only by her classmates and acquaintances. It was only after her death that more and more people began to pay attention and get to know her. So her life really started the moment she was executed. No one knows when her era will end, but we shall believe that there will be an end some day.</blockquote>
 
  
 
==== CDT Coverage ====
 
==== CDT Coverage ====

Latest revision as of 20:29, 12 January 2021

Fù Guóyǒng | 傅国涌

Fu Guoyong (b. 1967) is a popular writer and independent historian whose work focuses on Chinese intellectual history from the late imperial period to the present. Hailing from Yueqing, Zhejiang Province, Fu studied to become a teacher. He has written and edited dozens of books, including a biography of martial arts novelist Jin Yong. He is currently based in Hangzhou.

Fu has conducted extensive research on Lin Zhao, an outspoken critic of Mao who was executed for her beliefs. In 2014, Fu wrote an essay titled "Lin Zhao and Her Era" (林昭和她的时代) in which he argued that "her life really started the moment she was executed" and that "Lin Zhao’s era will not end until we can freely talk about her in Mainland China."

The essay briefly resurfaced in April 2020 (Lin Zhao was executed on April 29, 1968) before being censored again.

CDT Coverage