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没希望工程 (méi xī wàng gōng chéng): Project Hope-less
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没希望工程 (méi xīwàng gōngchéng): Project Hope-less
  
This is the title of [http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_4701280b010185jh.html an article] written by China’s preeminent blogger, [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Han  Han Han]. The article discusses a Chinese charity called “Project Hope” (希望工程) affiliated with the China Youth Development Foundation, a subsidiary of the Communist Youth League. Project Hope was organized to provide financial assistance to poor students; however, in 2002 there were allegations that Project Hope was misusing funds. When China’s leading investigative newspaper at the time, the Southern Weekend, prepared a story about the alleged corruption, the paper had to pull the story even though copies had already been printed.   
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This is the title of [http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_4701280b010185jh.html an article] written by China’s preeminent blogger, [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Han  Han Han]. The article discusses a Chinese charity called “Project Hope” (希望工程), affiliated with the China Youth Development Foundation, a subsidiary of the Communist Youth League. Project Hope was organized to provide financial assistance to poor students; however, in 2002 there were allegations that Project Hope was misusing funds. When China’s leading investigative newspaper at the time, the ''Southern Weekend'', prepared a story about the alleged corruption, the paper had to pull the story, even though copies had already been printed.   
  
Han Han discusses how charities in China are de-incentivized to properly manage their finances because, through their government connections, they are able to stifle criticism. He also criticizes the small amount China spends on education and health care compared to Hong Kong and the United States.
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Han Han discusses how charities in China are de-incentivized to properly manage their finances because, through their government connections, they are able to stifle criticism. He also criticizes the small amount China spends on education and health care compared to Hong Kong and the United States.
  
Project Hope was once again in the news in August 2011 when it was revealed that 1.5 billion yuan were being managed by twenty-four year-old [http://www.chinasmack.com/2011/stories/lu-meimei-china-africa-project-hope-charity-controversy.html Lu Xingyu] whose only qualification seemed to be that she was born to a [[rich second generation | rich and well-connected]] family.
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Project Hope was once again in the news in August 2011 when it was revealed that 1.5 billion yuan were being managed by twenty-four year-old [http://www.chinasmack.com/2011/stories/lu-meimei-china-africa-project-hope-charity-controversy.html Lu Xingyu], whose only qualification seemed to be that she was born to a [[rich second generation | rich and well-connected]] family.
  
For more on the government crackdown on reporting of “Project Hope,” see [http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/24/world/under-pressure-chinese-newspaper-pulls-expose-on-a-charity.html here].
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For more on the government crackdown on reporting of “Project Hope,” see the ''New York Times''’ [http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/24/world/under-pressure-chinese-newspaper-pulls-expose-on-a-charity.html 2002 report].
  
  
  
 
[[Category: Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]]
 
[[Category: Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon]]

Revision as of 15:23, 1 June 2012

没希望工程 (méi xīwàng gōngchéng): Project Hope-less

This is the title of an article written by China’s preeminent blogger, Han Han. The article discusses a Chinese charity called “Project Hope” (希望工程), affiliated with the China Youth Development Foundation, a subsidiary of the Communist Youth League. Project Hope was organized to provide financial assistance to poor students; however, in 2002 there were allegations that Project Hope was misusing funds. When China’s leading investigative newspaper at the time, the Southern Weekend, prepared a story about the alleged corruption, the paper had to pull the story, even though copies had already been printed.

Han Han discusses how charities in China are de-incentivized to properly manage their finances because, through their government connections, they are able to stifle criticism. He also criticizes the small amount China spends on education and health care compared to Hong Kong and the United States.

Project Hope was once again in the news in August 2011 when it was revealed that 1.5 billion yuan were being managed by twenty-four year-old Lu Xingyu, whose only qualification seemed to be that she was born to a rich and well-connected family.

For more on the government crackdown on reporting of “Project Hope,” see the New York Times2002 report.