China: A Hard Place to Defend.

From Angry Chinese Blogger blog:

It’s not an ancient saying, but maybe it should be “If you want to set yourself a hard task, try defending Mainland China without resorting to lies or name calling”. It’s possible, but can be rather difficult. It’s also a task that most people never meet. More often than not they either don’t bother to defend it, or they defend it with as much lying and name calling as they can muster (There’s a nasty name for people like this, and it’s often FenQing). However it’s a task that ACB strives to achieve on a regular basis as part of this blog’s mandate.

Indeed, when ACB started writing this blog ACB had a number of aims in mind. Amongst these aims two of the ones that feature the heaviest are as follows:

1) To correct common misconceptions about China created by foreigner’s scant knowledge of its history, culture and customs
2) To counter the misrepresentations of China being deliberately spread by the Western media, and by Western special interest groups, with anti-China agendas

Over the years ACB has struggled against pretty much every type of Foreign misconception and/or prejudice imaginable in order to defend China and to put the record straight, and has tackled everything from the sublime to the ridiculous, as well as a great many serious issues. Ranging from the daft idea that Chinese regularly kidnap white women and sell them into slavery, to the outdated belief that China is a Communist state in anything but name.

However, amongst all of these issues that ACB has dealt with during this time there is one issue where China more often needs condemming more often than it needs defending. This being the area of human rights. And even then it has not been a simple task to because doign it proiperly – That is doing it without falling into the traps that many Westerners seem to live in – is much harder than you might think. Indeed, human rights in China often requires a lot more background knowledge than most people have to understand properly, and a lot more time than ACB has to explain sufficiently.

To put things simply, the Chinese people have far fewer rights than most Westeners do. True, some of the rights that Westerners have aren’t always beneficial, and ACB cannot help but feel that many of them should better be considered privileges; that which should be withdrawn if abused. Also true that many of the rights that foreigners have simply aren’t of interest to Chinese. But this rather straying from the point: Chinese have fewer rights than Westerners.