'[W]orking in the best interests of the people and the public' [is] the stock phrase they use when responding to any and all complaints about the arbitrary freezing of your account. It seems to imply that in their eyes, you’re not a person, nor are you a member of 'the public.'”

— From a now-censored Weibo post by a popular food blogger describing her Kafka-esque interactions with the police "fraud-prevention squad" after all of her bank accounts were frozen due to a misidentification.

 

CDT Highlights

Latest

Quote of the Day: “Not So Much ‘Lying Down’ as Finding It Impossible to Get Ahead”

Today’s quote of the day derives from netizen backlash to the Communist Youth League’s (CYL) recent video broadside against “lying down”—referring to the much-discussed phenomenon of people slacking off, quietly giving up, or dropping out of the rat race as a means of coping with a hyper-competitive society that treats workers as “huminerals” to be relentlessly exploited and ultimately discarded. The video, widely circulated on the Chinese internet, was titled “CYL Central Committee: ‘Only a Tiny Minority Are Truly Lying Down, While the Vast Majority Are Working Tirelessly.’” This was...

  • Recent News
  • Human Rights
  • Translation
  • Politics
  • Hong Kong
  • Information Revolution
  • CDT Bookshelf
  • Economy
  • Society
  • Sci-Tech
  • Law
  • The Great Divide

China Shuns Swiss Peace Summit to Support Russia

Xi Jinping’s hosting of Russian President Vladimir Putin in Beijing two weeks ago has sharpened attention to the trajectory of China and Russia’s relationship. Xi’s diplomatic meetings with European leaders have consistently fueled European disunity, while those with Putin have fostered reinforced Sino-Russian ties in opposition to the U.S. and China’s ongoing support of Russia’s war against Ukraine. These trends appear to be continuing. This week, the U.S. threatened to apply further sanctions on China over its support for Russia’s war. On Friday, as Laurie Chen and Liz Lee reported...

Tiananmen Anniversary Inspires Reflection on Palestine

On the 35th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre, people around the world commemorated with vigils and recollections, while Chinese authorities massively censored references to the incident in the mainland and Hong Kong. Some have also drawn connections between the dynamics of protest and repression in Beijing in 1989 and those regarding Palestine in the present day. On June 3, Yangyang Cheng reflected at The Nation on the legacy of Tiananmen and its instrumentalization abroad in a piece hinging on the Tiananmen protest tent enshrined at New York’s June 4 Museum and the contemporary protest...

Quote of the Day: “Not So Much ‘Lying Down’ as Finding It Impossible to Get Ahead”

Today’s quote of the day derives from netizen backlash to the Communist Youth League’s (CYL) recent video broadside against “lying down”—referring to the much-discussed phenomenon of people slacking off, quietly giving up, or dropping out of the rat race as a means of coping with a hyper-competitive society that treats workers as “huminerals” to be relentlessly exploited and ultimately discarded. The video, widely circulated on the Chinese internet, was titled “CYL Central Committee: ‘Only a Tiny Minority Are Truly Lying Down, While the Vast Majority Are Working Tirelessly.’” This was...

New “June Fourth” Sensitive Words Reference PLA Medals and Hong Kong Musicians

In China, the 35th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre was met with all-out digital censorship that quashed overt online mourning. In Hong Kong, efforts to publicly commemorate “June Fourth” were ruthlessly suppressed by police. Globally, across 18 cities spanning four continents, thousands gathered in remembrance. Those within China seeking to share their memories of the spring and summer of 1989 were forced to publish their recollections in foreign outlets, a selection of which CDT archived and translated. The dominant theme on the mainland, however, was censorship. CDT Chinese has...

New “June Fourth” Sensitive Words Reference PLA Medals and Hong Kong Musicians

In China, the 35th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre was met with all-out digital censorship that quashed overt online mourning. In Hong Kong, efforts to publicly commemorate “June Fourth” were ruthlessly suppressed by police. Globally, across 18 cities spanning four continents, thousands gathered in remembrance. Those within China seeking to share their memories of the spring and summer of 1989 were forced to publish their recollections in foreign outlets, a selection of which CDT archived and translated. The dominant theme on the mainland, however, was censorship. CDT Chinese has...

Translation: Special One-Month Reconnaissance Operation Against “Overseas Cyber Forces”

A pair of recently surfaced screenshots appear to offer unusual detail about a special month-long operation, held in Beijing and involving over 40 Ministry of Public Security computer specialists from around the country, to combat “overseas cyber forces” in the battle for public opinion. The apparently leaked internal instructions from the Ministry of Public Security are likely to be the result of an email breach. They include the names and locations of many of the computer-specialist officers, as well as the name and contact information of the individual in charge of the operation. At some...

New eBook: China Digital Times Lexicon, 20th Anniversary Edition

On September 12, 2003, John Battelle published the first post on chinadigitaltimes.net: Here’s what a Google Search on “china weblog” yields, I’m looking forward to seeing ours at the top soon! China’s online population at the start of that year was nearly 60 million. Ten years later, it was fast approaching 600 million, and now, after 20, it is well over a billion. This new completely revised and hugely expanded update to our ebook series, formerly known as “the Grass Mud Horse Lexicon,” aims to capture something of the enormous explosion of online speech that accompanied this growth, with...

Quote of the Day: “Not So Much ‘Lying Down’ as Finding It Impossible to Get Ahead”

Today’s quote of the day derives from netizen backlash to the Communist Youth League’s (CYL) recent video broadside against “lying down”—referring to the much-discussed phenomenon of people slacking off, quietly giving up, or dropping out of the rat race as a means of coping with a hyper-competitive society that treats workers as “huminerals” to be relentlessly exploited and ultimately discarded. The video, widely circulated on the Chinese internet, was titled “CYL Central Committee: ‘Only a Tiny Minority Are Truly Lying Down, While the Vast Majority Are Working Tirelessly.’” This was...

Quote of the Day: “Not So Much ‘Lying Down’ as Finding It Impossible to Get Ahead”

Today’s quote of the day derives from netizen backlash to the Communist Youth League’s (CYL) recent video broadside against “lying down”—referring to the much-discussed phenomenon of people slacking off, quietly giving up, or dropping out of the rat race as a means of coping with a hyper-competitive society that treats workers as “huminerals” to be relentlessly exploited and ultimately discarded. The video, widely circulated on the Chinese internet, was titled “CYL Central Committee: ‘Only a Tiny Minority Are Truly Lying Down, While the Vast Majority Are Working Tirelessly.’” This was...

Censors Delete Tale of Police Overreach in Anti-Fraud Case

Last week, Weibo censors took down a post by a popular food blogger describing how all her bank accounts were frozen due to a local police department’s arbitrary and unprofessional “anti-fraud” case work. Her Kafka-esque account described how her accounts were shut down without any explanation, leaving her forced to “do all of the detective work” herself—only to learn that she was under investigation for fraud under the barest of pretenses. Her account is but the latest example of anti-fraud overreach. In April, CDT published a translation of a man’s account of being threatened by anti-fraud...

Memories of a Massacre: Recollections of June Fourth Beyond Beijing

Despite near absolute censorship of any mention of the Tiananmen Massacre within China, memories of June Fourth still persist. On the 35th anniversary of the 1989 student movement’s suppression, a number of people who lived through the era published personal recollections to overseas websites. CDT has archived their essays and translated selected excerpts from each.  Jiang Xue, a leading Chinese journalist now reporting from exile, published a mix of reportage and memoir in Wainao (WHYNOT), a Chinese-language online magazine. She recalled how the events played out in her small hometown...

Quote of the Day: Official Disposable Income Figures Derided as “Today’s Daily Dose of Humor”

On March 16, China’s National Bureau of Statistics announced that the Chinese economy was off to a good start in 2024, with reported 5.3% year-on-year GDP growth in the first quarter of the year. The better-than-expected data was touted by various Chinese state media outlets online, although many of those news posts had comment filtering enabled, perhaps in anticipation of negative or skeptical reactions from social media users. Two items in particular seemed to strike netizens as overly optimistic: the reported “nationwide average per-capita disposable income” figure of 11,539 yuan...

Human Rights

Latest

Tiananmen Anniversary Inspires Reflection on Palestine

On the 35th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre, people around the world commemorated with vigils and recollections, while Chinese authorities massively censored references to the incident in the mainland and Hong Kong. Some have also drawn connections between the dynamics of protest and repression in Beijing in 1989 and those regarding Palestine in the present day. On June 3, Yangyang Cheng reflected at The Nation on the legacy of Tiananmen and its instrumentalization abroad in a piece hinging on the Tiananmen protest tent enshrined at New York’s June 4 Museum and the contemporary protest...

Politics

Latest

Chengyu for Xi Jinping’s New Era (Part 2): Malice, Ducks, and Human Resources

Xi Jinping’s New Era has inspired the creation of a host of “new chengyu”: idiomatic, often four-character, literary expressions that are the kernel of a larger tale. New Era chengyu are references to infamous incidents that have taken place under Xi’s rule, either satirical twists on classic phrases or new coinages that fit the form. Two weeks ago, CDT published Part 1 of the series, introducing the phrases: “Yunhao Blocks the Plow (云浩止耕, Yúnhào zhǐ gēng),” a reference to the brash thuggery of some rural cadres; “Ji Doesn’t Know the Law (纪不懂法, Jì bù dǒng fǎ),” a lament about the lack of...

Society

Latest