Minitrue: No Live-Streaming of U.S. Election

The following censorship instructions, issued to the media by government authorities, about coverage of the U.S. election, have been leaked and distributed online.

Live streams on Tencent, Sohu, Netease have already been stopped by Beijing and Guangdong Cyberspace Administration, and have simultaneously been severely criticized. They will be punished accordingly.

Be sure to follow orders on disabling live-streams and fragmented synchronization, etc.

If you find other websites that are carrying live-streams, immediately report them. State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film, and Television and its Beijing branch will crack down. [Chinese]

Last week, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued new rules regulating live-streaming, requiring all live-streamers commenting on news or current events to apply for official accreditation, and to have their scripts approved by an editor. Live-streams of debates earlier in the election process had also been banned, though at least one was broadcast on Sina.

As appeared ready to pull off a stunning upset in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Chinese cartoonists Badiucao and Rebel Pepper responded swiftly:

真Since directives are sometimes communicated orally to journalists and editors, who then leak them online, the wording published here may not be exact. The date given may indicate when the directive was leaked, rather than when it was issued. CDT does its utmost to verify dates and wording, but also takes precautions to protect the source. See CDT’s collection of Directives from the Ministry of Truth since 2011.

Correction: This post was edited to correct “State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film, and Television and its Beijing branch,” which had been inaccurately translated.