starbucks

China Tea Growers Shift to Coffee

As China’s tea farmers look to coffee for more profits, the Los Angeles Times reports the Yunnan provincial government plans to increase the production of coffee to 200,000 tons by 2020: “My sole income depends on...

Starbucks’ China Growth Bucks Trend

At an investor conference on Wednesday, Starbucks executives said they expect China to become the company’s largest market outside the United States by 2014, as the coffee retail giant has maintained robust sales growth...

China Strategies: Walmart and Starbucks

After building an empire on cheap imports from China, Walmart is trying to attract the country’s new rich with low prices online, as economic slowdown dampens conspicuous consumption. From Marcus Wohlsen at Wired: Walmart faces...

Why Starbucks Succeeds in China

Starbucks’ expansion in China, despite one widely publicised early misstep, has been ferocious, with surging store numbers and an experimental foray into coffee farming in Yunnan. At CNBC.com, Shaun Rein explains why the...

Coffee Farming in the Home of Pu'er Tea

Since 1988, Yunnan’s coffee production has grown almost 24-fold, thanks in part to the efforts of Swiss food leviathan Nestle. From MSNBC: “Before I started growing coffee, I couldn’t afford a house like the...

Kung Fu, Tai Chi, Hoohah

Film star Jet Li’s planned promotion of Tai Chi around the world, backed by Chinese Internet entrepreneur Jack Ma, is no mere business venture. Rather, it is an heroic attempt to boost China’s currently feeble...

Doughnut Wars Give Shanghai a Sugar Jolt

The Washington Post describes doughnut vendors’ struggle to establish a beachhead in Shanghai, while other Western fast food firms move on to later stages in their China campaigns. Doughnut shops, once a rarity here, have...

Tempest in a Coffee Cup – Tim Johnson

China Rises and Shanghaiist blogs both discuss the new coffee shop that has replaced Starbucks in the Forbidden City, after the presence of Starbucks raised the hackles of a TV host and numerous bloggers. They also included a photo of the former Starbucks’ current look in the Forbidden City. For a more in-depth look at […]

Starbuck Leaves, the Forbidden City Cafe Arrives – Deng Haijian

From Hong Wang, translated by CDT: The Forbidden City‘s Jiuqing Chaofang has once again been connected to coffee, as a new cafe has opened at the former site of Starbucks cafe. Seven years ago, when the American Starbucks company opened its coffee shop here, Jiuqing Chaofang became famous. Two months after Starbucks left, the Forbidden […]

Starbucks Closes Forbidden City Store – Melissa Allison

From The Seattle Times via Danwei: Starbucks closed its store in Beijing’s Forbidden City today after months of controversy over the U.S. coffee-shop chain doing business there. The decision followed the Forbidden City’s announcement that it wants to operate all stores inside the former imperial palace, which is now a museum. “We have respectfully decided […]

China Lawmaker Wants Forbidden City Free of Starbucks – Reuters

From Reuters: A member of China’s parliament has demanded the immediate closure of a Starbucks coffee shop set up inside Beijing’s Forbidden City, the Xinhua news agency reported on Sunday. Two months after a television host launched an online campaign to evict Starbucks Corp. from the former home of Chinese emperors, the seven-year-old store has […]

China’s growing blogosphere turns on US coffee icon – Peter Ford

From The Christian Science Monitor: The appeal of blogs in a country where the traditional media are strictly censored by the government which uses them to propagate approved information and opinions, lies in both the relative freedom they enjoy, and in their interactivity. Even for those not especially interested in politics, “blogs tell me about […]

How blogging can galvanize China – Geoffrey A. Fowler

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: All of the spin-control efforts that have made blogging a challenge for brands in America are compounded in China. “There is not a precedent for solving consumer grievances in China. If you are not happy with what you buy, you don’t call up customer service,” said Scott Kronick, the president of […]

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