Products Made in China Often Cost More There Than in the West

From the Los Angeles Times:

Kobe Bryant’s sneakers with the Made in China label go for $165 in the U.S. But at an official Nike store in China? $190. A flat-screen Sony TV assembled by Chinese laborers runs about $800 at a Best Buy store in the U.S. But you’d pay 30% more at the popular Chinese appliance chain Gome. The same goes for that Maclaren Techno XT infant stroller. It’s also manufactured here, but you’ll typically pay 40% more for one at a Beijing mall than you would in the U.S.

It’s a paradox of life here in the world’s factory floor. The place known for delivering low-cost goods to Western doesn’t always do the same for its own people.

This may have been of little consequence to economists and world leaders a few years ago. But today, getting China’s consumers to open their wallets is crucial to balancing a wobbly global economy grown too dependent on American and European shoppers.

It won’t be easy. Chinese households are already famously frugal — and with good reason. A flimsy social safety net means tens of millions must save for their own education, and . And while has been rising along with China’s prosperity, it has done so almost in spite of an economic model geared almost exclusively toward production rather than domestic .

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