In China, Protests Underscore a Rift over Dialects

The Los Angeles Times reports on the current tensions over vs. use in Guangzhou:

For years Cantonese speakers in southern China have complained that local culture is being eroded under orders from Beijing, where Mandarin dominates. The recent protests highlight a traditional rivalry between north and south as well as the government’s efforts to bring the country under one , local residents and experts say.

Cantonese — as the second most spoken in China and until recently the language most common among Chinese living abroad — has long been a key part of Chinese culture.

Generations of Cantonese-speaking built ’s first Chinatowns and introduced dim sum, chop suey and Bruce Lee (the martial artist and film star was born in but mostly grew up in China).

As more Mandarin-speaking migrants from other parts of China move into Guangzhou and other Chinese communities across the world, Cantonese is becoming less prominent, analysts and experts say. And the government is speeding up the process, they say.

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