Word of the Week: Hair Removal

Editor’s Note: The CDT Grass-Mud Horse Lexicon is a glossary of terms created by Chinese netizens and frequently encountered in online political discussions. These are the words of China’s online “resistance discourse,” used to mock and subvert the official language around censorship and political correctness. The Word of the Week features Lexicon entries old, new and timely.

If you are interested in participating in this project by submitting and/or translating terms, please contact the CDT editors at CDT [at] chinadigitaltimes [dot] net.

去毛 (qù máo): hair removal

Mao excised from the 100 yuan bill.

While most search results for this term are for sites selling shaving creams and razors, it also has a political meaning. Mao Zedong’s surname (毛) literally means “hair.” Therefore, to “de-hair” can also mean to de-Mao; 去毛化 (qù máo huà) means “de-Mao-ification,” or the minimization of Mao Zedong thought and Mao’s role in history.