Drawing the News: Evil Kungfu Panda and More

This week, showcases on the , ’s attempt at populism and official corruption:

Artist: (via Over the Wall)

Rebel Pepper comments on the vigor of recent anti-Japan protests following Japan’s purchase of three of the . He notes that the mob’s reaction to Japan mirrors perennial anger with the “Old Monk” (the Dalai Lama). When pro-Tibet demonstrations hounded Olympic torchbearers in 2008, Heilongjiang provincial websites were instructed to direct patriotic discussions at the “Dalai clique’s secessionist forces.”

 

Artist:

Anti-Japan protesters can be as viciously patriotic as they wish, but they are not permitted to inject any domestic issues into their list of demands. The dispute is a convenient distraction from the evergreen problems of poverty and corruption in China. “Patriotic fervor” won’t improve people’s lives any more than a little Chinese flag will help a beggar on the street.



Artist: David 8th Generation (via AmazeNews)

CCTV’s flagship evening news show, (News Simulcast), just announced an updated format which will include more “people’s voices” (民生) in its reporting. David 8th Generation (@大家画大卫8世) drew this cartoon to “congratulate” Xinwen Lianbo on the change. The eye at the top represents the show’s current programming. The format change will not open anyone’s eyes.

Artist: Sinking Stone

“Watch Brother” Yang Dacai lost his job after smiling at the scene of a horrific truck crash and brandishing multiple luxury watches. Consciously or not, he is now pulling other officials down with him. Sinking Stone imagines a sinister Kungfu Panda, ready to pounce from his perch atop a government stamp and then hightail it to the U.S. with his green card. “What goes around comes around,” reads the caption. “Who doesn’t own a few watches?


Artist:

“Subconsciously striking you is like swatting a fly!” exclaims the cartoon version of police officer Zhang Yan. Zhang and a crew of construction workers battled a farming family at the scene of a forced demolition in the town of Panjin. One villager, Wang Shujie, allegedly set himself on fire and rushed at Zhang with a sickle. Zhang then says he “subconsciously fired his gun” six times, killing Wang. Cradled in Zhang’s broken arm, Rebel Pepper will have none of it.

Irene Hsiao contributed translation.